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Volume 1 , Issue 1 , December 2015 , Pages: 20 - 23
Single Particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) For the Detection of Metal-Based Nanoparticles in Environmental Matrices: Application to Silver Nanoparticles in Surface Water
C. Stephan, PerkinElmer, Product Specialist Sales Departement, 501 Rowntree Dairy road, Unit 6, Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada
K. J. Wilkinson, University of Montréal, Department of Chemistry, Montréal, Québec, Canada
M. Hadioui, University of Montréal, Department of Chemistry, Montréal, Québec, Canada
Received: Jul. 14, 2015;       Accepted: Jul. 28, 2015;       Published: Jul. 29, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.nsnm.20150101.14        View        Downloads  
Abstract
The National Nanotechnology Initiative defines engineered nanomaterials (ENM) as those with dimensions of 1–100 nm, where their unique characteristics enable novel applications to be carried out. ENMs often possess different properties than their bulk counterparts of the same composition, making them of great interest for a broad spectrum of industrial, commercial, and health care uses. However, the widespread application of ENMs will inevitably lead to their release into the environment, which raises concerns about their potential adverse effects on the ecosystems and their impact on human health. This paper discusses the theory of Single Particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) and in particular, its use in characterizing, counting and sizing metal-based nanoparticles in Environmental Matrices. This breakthrough advancement in ICP-MS allows researchers to track the fate/transformation of nanoparticles in various matrices. Single Particle-ICP-MS allow the differentiation between ionic and particulate signals without any separation, measure particle concentration down to as low as 1000 particles/mL with great precision and determine particle size and size distribution. With fast sample analysis time, SP-ICP-MS is a key analytical technique in assessing the fate, behavior and distribution of ENMs in different sample Environmental Matrices.
Keywords
Single Particle ICP-MS, SP-ICP-MS, Silver, Fate, Environmental Monitoring, Nanoparticles, Dissolution, Agglomeration
To cite this article
C. Stephan, K. J. Wilkinson, M. Hadioui, Single Particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) For the Detection of Metal-Based Nanoparticles in Environmental Matrices: Application to Silver Nanoparticles in Surface Water, Nanoscience and Nanometrology. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2015, pp. 20-23. doi: 10.11648/j.nsnm.20150101.14
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Effect of Dwell Time on Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Data Acquisition Quality: A. Hineman and C. Stephan, Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry 29, 1252-1257, (2014)
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Improvements in the Detection and Characterization of Engineered Nanoparticles Using SP-ICP-MS with Microsecond Dwell Times: M.D. Montano, H.R. Badiei, S. Bazargan, J. F. Ranville; Environmental Science Nano, DOI: 10.1039/c4en00058g, (2014)
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Assessing the Fate of Silver Nanoparticles of Surface Waters using Single Particle ICP-MS: Madjid Hadioui PhD Université de Montréal; Kevin Wilkinson PhD Université de Montréal; Chady Stephan, Perkin Elmer Inc. http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Images/44-157260NexION350XSilverNanoparticlesInSurfaceWater.pdf
[ 8 ]
Quantitative Evaluation of Nanoparticles Dissolution Kinetics, a case study with Silver Nanoparticles: Denise Mitrano, James F. Ranville, Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry Colorado School of Mines Golden CO,USA; Chady Stephan Perkin Elmer Inc. Shelton, CT
[ 9 ]
Gold Nanoparticle Uptake by Tomato Plants Characterized by Single Particle ICP-MS: Yongbo Dan1,2, Weilan Zhang3, Xingmao Ma2,3,Honglan Shi1,2, Chady Stephan4. 1Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology. 2Center for Single Nanoparticle, Single Cell, and Single Molecule Monitoring (CS3M), Missouri University of Science and Technology. 3Department of Civil and Environmental. Engineering, Southern Illinois University. 4PerkinElmer, Inc. http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Im ages/44-173327APP_NexION-350-Gold-NP-Uptake-by-Plants-012175_01.pdf
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Analysis of Nanoparticles in Biological Tissues using Single Particle ICP-MS: Evan Gray, Cristopher P. Higgings Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; James F. Ranville Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Images/44-161572APP_NexION-350Q-Silver-Nanoparticles-in-Bio-Tissues-011803_01.pdf
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C. Stephan and K. Neubaeur, Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Understanding How and Why http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Images/44-157257NanoSingleParticleICPMSTheory.pdf.
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